Full tree structure.
Out in the wild.Flower structure and detail.Leaf structure and detail.

Dodonaea

$50.00

A thin stemmed indigenous shrub or upright small tree occasionally growing to 8m with a light crown, it can grow from sea level upto 2800m.

This tree is widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. They can grow in a variety of habitats ranging from riverine forests, rocky soil habitats or marginally arid areas.

Product Description

Botanical Name: Dodonaea

Species: Angustifolia

Family: Sapindaceae

Common Name: Sand Olive

Local Name: Mkengata

General Information: A thin stemmed indigenous shrub or upright small tree occasionally growing to 8m with a light crown, it can grow from sea level up to 2800m.

Habitat: This tree is widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. They can grow in a variety of habitats ranging from riverine forests, rocky soil habitats or marginally arid areas.

Flowers: Small with shiny greenish-yellow sepals and no petals that appear in short dense leaf heads. Male flowers have pale brown stamens.

Fruits: Distinctive 2cm capsules, usually with 3 papery wings, that are sometimes inflated and in masses that resemble blossoms. The wings are greenish, pale brown or coral pink in appearance.

Leaves: Thin, narrow and stiffly erect up to 10cm long and widest towards the tip. They are light green and sticky when young with a pointed apex with a tapering base to a short stock.

Bark: Dark grey, fissured and peeling with branchlets that are rusty red and resinous.

Uses: The wood is hard and heavy, which makes it useful for making implement handles, walking sticks, fire wood and charcoal. Additionally, this particular tree is widely used as a hedge.

Medical: A decoction of leaves and twigs is used to remedy colds, flu, stomach troubles, measles, arthritis and sore throats. A root decoction is taken by women to stimulate milk production. Pounded leaves steeped in cold water and strained tend to serve as a remedy for diarrhea.

Propagation: Direct sowing of seeds, use of seedlings or wildings.